Monthly Archives: August 2010

A Belated Thought on Wikileaks

by Graham Dumas (J.D. Candidate 2011) I am a bit late in writing about the Wikileaks issue, but I would like to propose here a slightly different way of viewing the question through the lens of systems engineering. For a … Continue reading

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The State of China’s Legal Profession

In a report issued this past May, the New York City Bar Association’s Council on International Affairs detailed the findings of a December 2009 mission to Beijing, China. The resulting picture is saddening and complex, and raises important questions. Continue reading

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Book Review: Begley’s Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters

This installment in our ongoing series of book reviews takes on Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters by lawyer/novelist Louis Begley.  Hugh Murtaugh’s complimentary review of Begley’s work intertwines the Dreyfus and the Guantanamo narratives.  Both Begley and this reviewer conclude with the same lament … Continue reading

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Cohen on Human Rights in China

On Saturday, the New York Times published an interview with NYU Professor Jerome A. Cohen regarding legal developments in China and the country’s human rights record.  From the interview: “There are now some 200,000 judges, close to 180,000 prosecutors, roughly … Continue reading

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Koskenniemi the scholar vs. Koskenniemi the commissioner

Sahib Singh of the University of Vienna has posted a paper on SSRN titled The Ethics of Fragmentation: Formalism’s Fallacies and the Potential of International Law.  The paper is interesting not least because it takes a serious and critical work … Continue reading

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