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A Belated Thought on Wikileaks

by Gra­ham Dumas (J.D. Can­di­date 2011)

I am a bit late in writ­ing about the Wik­ileaks issue, but I would like to pro­pose here a slight­ly dif­fer­ent way of view­ing the ques­tion through the lens of sys­tems engi­neer­ing. For a num­ber of rea­sons, Wik­ileaks has pre­sent­ed to mem­bers of the mil­i­tary a sim­pli­fied and seem­ing­ly less painful way to report vio­la­tions of IHL, lead­ing to a break­down in, or rather an excur­sion from, the process the U.S. Mil­i­tary has been using to report, iden­ti­fy, pros­e­cute, and ulti­mate­ly pre­vent vio­la­tions of mil­i­tary law and the law of armed con­flict. To rem­e­dy this prob­lem, the mil­i­tary should inves­ti­gate both the demand and sup­ply sides of the infor­ma­tion pipeline, sim­pli­fy the report­ing process, and ini­ti­ate a cam­paign to edu­cate ser­vice­men of the inter­nal report­ing chan­nels avail­able to them, the need to pre­vent extra­ne­ous leaks to the pub­lic, and the penal­ties for releas­ing clas­si­fied infor­ma­tion.  More after the jump.

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Book Review: Begley’s Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters

This install­ment in our ongo­ing series of book reviews takes on Why the Drey­fus Affair Mat­ters by lawyer/novelist Louis Beg­ley.  Hugh Murtaugh’s com­pli­men­ta­ry review of Begley’s work inter­twines the Drey­fus and the Guan­tanamo nar­ra­tives.  Both Beg­ley and this review­er con­clude with the same lament from Proust: “As for ask­ing one­self about its val­ue, not one thought of it now .… It was no longer shock­ing. That was all that was required.”

By Hugh K. Murtagh

The sto­ry of Guan­tanamo Bay is not over. Pres­i­dent Oba­ma will not be able to shut­ter the island prison until at least 2011, and then only by mov­ing the remain­ing detainees to a state­side facil­i­ty. Time pass­es, details emerge: the “Camp Delta Stan­dard Oper­at­ing Pro­ce­dures” find their way onto the inter­net; a mil­i­tary judge will not allow the pros­e­cu­tion of a ter­ror­ist leader because he has been so bad­ly abused; Sami al-Hajj, the al-Jazeera jour­nal­ist held for years on chang­ing unsub­stan­ti­at­ed charges, is final­ly released to Sudan, with his diaries.

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Cohen on Human Rights in China

On Saturday, the New York Times published an interview with NYU Professor Jerome A. Cohen regarding legal developments in China and the country's human rights record.  From the interview: “There are now some 200,000 judges, close to 180,000 prosecutors, roughly…

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Koskenniemi the scholar vs. Koskenniemi the commissioner

Sahib Singh of the Uni­ver­si­ty of Vien­na has post­ed a paper on SSRN titled The Ethics of Frag­men­ta­tion: Formalism’s Fal­lac­i­es and the Poten­tial of Inter­na­tion­al Law.  The paper is inter­est­ing not least because it takes a seri­ous and crit­i­cal work at the frag­men­ta­tion report of 2006, pre­pared for the Inter­na­tion­al Law Com­mis­sion by Mart­ti Kosken­nie­mi.  Singh’s paper inves­ti­gates the work of a first-rate schol­ar close­ly affil­i­at­ed with NYU Law’s Hauser Glob­al Law School pro­gram, and for that alone it would be worth read­ing for NYU inter­na­tion­al law stu­dents.  But Singh’s paper is fas­ci­nat­ing because it inves­ti­gates the ten­sion between Koskenniemi’s per­son­al work and the report.  Abstract after the jump.

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