Author Archives: Alexander Ehrle

Book Review: Foreign Policy of the European Union—Assessing Europe’s Role in the World. By Federiga Bindi and Irina Angelescu (eds.)

Foreign Policy of the European Union—Assessing Europe’s Role in the World sets out to treat the foreign relations of the EU in a holistic, all-encompassing manner. For this purpose the book is divided into five parts, each of which develops … Continue reading

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Some Quick Thoughts on Transnational Human Rights Litigation in American Courts After Kiobel

By: Professor Burt Neuborne [*] The hope that the ATS would permit entrepreneurial lawyers to choreograph international human rights cases involving: (1) alien plaintiffs; (2) alien corporate defendants; and (3) acts wholly occurring abroad into an American court in an effort … Continue reading

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R.I.P. A.T.S.? How much of the Alien Tort Statute survives the Supreme Court’s Kiobel Decision?

This morning, the Supreme Court dismissed the human rights claims of a group of Nigerian nationals against Royal Dutch Petroleum (Shell) under the Alien Tort Statute (A.T.S.) in a 9-0 decision, though the justices split 5-4 as to the reasoning. … Continue reading

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Chinese Attitudes to International Law: China, the Security Council, Sovereignty, and Intervention

China vetoing a February 2012 UN Security Council resolution. China’s engagement with the UN Security Council has received close attention since its veto of UN action in Syria in February 2012. Some commentators have argued that this veto signals the … Continue reading

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Territorial-based Income Taxation as International Ostracism

Taxes not only serve to raise public revenues but also to shape the behavior of taxpayers, and thus of the economy as a whole.  The tax neutrality of Adam Smith is, therefore, the most hypocritical aspiration of any tax policy.  … Continue reading

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