Tag Archives: Human Rights

Some Quick Thoughts on Transnational Human Rights Litigation in American Courts After Kiobel

by Professor Burt Neuborne [*] The hope that the ATS would permit entrepreneurial lawyers to choreograph international human rights cases involving: (1) alien plaintiffs; (2) alien corporate defendants; and (3) acts wholly occurring abroad into an American court in an effort … Continue reading

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Earlier Supreme Court Jurisprudence Shows Hope Not Lost for Those Seeking Corporate Accountability in U.S. Courts

By: Carey Shenkman[*] Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court set a deeply alarming precedent in its decision in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, holding in substance 5-4 that the presumption against extraterritoriality defends corporations from being held accountable for human rights abuses like torture, … Continue reading

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R.I.P. A.T.S.? How much of the Alien Tort Statute survives the Supreme Court’s Kiobel Decision?

This morning, the Supreme Court dismissed the human rights claims of a group of Nigerian nationals against Royal Dutch Petroleum (Shell) under the Alien Tort Statute (A.T.S.) in a 9-0 decision, though the justices split 5-4 as to the reasoning. … Continue reading

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Issue: Fall 2010

The Fall 2010 issue of the Journal of International Law and Politics is available at our official NYU website.  The contents are as follows: Georges Abi-Saab, The Normalization of International Adjudication: Convergence and Divergencies, 43 N.Y.U. J. Int’l L. & … Continue reading

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Waldron on Vagueness, the Rule of Law, and Torture

This week, Professor Lawrence Solum’s Legal Theory Blog features Vagueness and the Guidance of Action by Jeremy Waldron (NYU Law).  The paper is relevant to this blog not only for its general discussion on rule of law values, but also … Continue reading

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Video from Arctic Symposium

NYU Law has posted video of our Oct. 22 symposium on “International Law and Environmental Protection in a Melting Arctic.”  Below is the keynote address, given by Peter Taksoe-Jensen, Danish Ambassador to the United States.  The Ambassador’s speech begins at … Continue reading

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Center for Human Rights Reports on Foreign Land Deals

JILP staff Lauren DeMartini and Sylwia Wewiora have contributed to a recent report by the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice on Foreign Land Deals and Human Rights.  The report was developed in support of the mandate of the … Continue reading

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Book Review: Cipriani’s Children’s Rights and the Minimum Age of Criminal Responsibility

This installment in our ongoing series of book reviews looks at Children’s Rights and the Minimum Age of Criminal Responsibility by Don Cipriani. Michael Gigante’s review takes a critical eye towards the arguments Cipriani advances in favor of requiring all … Continue reading

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Lewis Wins Cohen Prize for Article on Exclusionary Rule

JILP has awarded the Jerome A. Cohen Prize for International Law and East Asia to Professor Margaret Lewis (Seton Hall) for her article Controlling Abuse to Maintain Control: The Exclusionary Rule in China. The abstract: In July 2010, the People’s … Continue reading

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Book Review: Stacy’s Human Rights for the 21st Century

In the latest installment of book reviews, Nalini Gupta lauds Human Rights for the 21st Century, by Helen M. Stacy for providing a comprehensive analysis of human rights work. However, Gupta notes that Stacy risks oversimplifying the issues in her … Continue reading

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