Tag Archives: Human Rights

Book Review: Temkin’s The Sacco-Vanzetti Affair

This installment in our ongoing series of book reviews features J. Benton Heath’s assessment of Moshik Temkin’s The Sacco-Vanzetti Affair: America on Trial. In his review, Heath finds that Temkin’s book brings a unique international dimension to the analysis of … Continue reading

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The International Relations Value of Criminal Tribunals

By Graham Dumas, (J.D. Candidate 2011) Much has been made in recent(ish) literature about the defects of criminal tribunals in post-conflict societies. Multiple authors over the past decade have rightly noted that such fora have dubious positive effects on the … Continue reading

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Posner on Human Rights, War, and Reciprocity

Eric Posner (U. Chicago) will present a paper titled Human Rights, the Laws of War, and Reciprocity at NYU Law’s Hauser Colloquium this Wednesday at 2 p.m.  The paper focuses on U.S. counterterrorism policy. It argues that the relative successes … Continue reading

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The State of China’s Legal Profession

In a report issued this past May, the New York City Bar Association’s Council on International Affairs detailed the findings of a December 2009 mission to Beijing, China. The resulting picture is saddening and complex, and raises important questions. Continue reading

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Book Review: Begley’s Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters

This installment in our ongoing series of book reviews takes on Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters by lawyer/novelist Louis Begley.  Hugh Murtaugh’s complimentary review of Begley’s work intertwines the Dreyfus and the Guantanamo narratives.  Both Begley and this reviewer conclude with the same lament … Continue reading

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Cohen on Human Rights in China

On Saturday, the New York Times published an interview with NYU Professor Jerome A. Cohen regarding legal developments in China and the country’s human rights record.  From the interview: “There are now some 200,000 judges, close to 180,000 prosecutors, roughly … Continue reading

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Making Amends

Over at Opinio Juris this morning, my good friend and colleague Scott Paul introduced the Making Amends Campaign, which is led by the Campaign for Innocent Victims in Conflict (CIVIC).  Scott and CIVIC are working to develop a general practice … Continue reading

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Book Review: The Least Worst Place (Karen Greenberg)

Continuing with the theme of armed conflict, detention, and terrorism, the latest installment in our occasional series of book reviews addresses Karen Greenberg’s The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo’s First 100 Days.  This review may also be found in Issue 42:3 … Continue reading

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Ryan Goodman on Detention in Armed Conflict

NYU Professor Ryan Goodman is among the many esteemed contributors to the latest entry in the U.S. Naval War College’s International Law Studies (Blue Book) Series.  This volume of the Series is titled The War in Afghanistan: A Legal Analysis.  … Continue reading

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Thoughts on the Targeted Killings Report

By Ben Heath To continue the discussion of Professor Philip Alston’s report on targeted killings, I can imagine no better discussion on the self-defense rationale for drone strikes than that presented by Marko Milanovic at the EJIL blog.  (At Opinio … Continue reading

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